CiteWeb id: 20000000182

CiteWeb score: 3724

DOI: 10.1126/science.289.5484.1504

Osteoporosis, a disease endemic in Western society, typically reflects an imbalance in skeletal turnover so that bone resorption exceeds bone formation. Bone resorption is the unique function of the osteoclast, and anti-osteoporosis therapy to date has targeted this cell. The osteoclast is a specialized macrophage polykaryon whose differentiation is principally regulated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor, RANK ligand, and osteoprotegerin. Reflecting integrin-mediated signals, the osteoclast develops a specialized cytoskeleton that permits it to establish an isolated microenvironment between itself and bone, wherein matrix degradation occurs by a process involving proton transport. Osteopetrotic mutants have provided a wealth of information about the genes that regulate the differentiation of osteoclasts and their capacity to resorb bone.

The publication "Bone Resorption by Osteoclasts" is placed in the Top 10000 of the best publications in CiteWeb. Also in the category Biology it is included to the Top 1000. Additionally, the publicaiton "Bone Resorption by Osteoclasts" is placed in the Top 1000 among other scientific works published in 2000.
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