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CiteWeb id: 20150000116

CiteWeb score: 1346

DOI: 10.15288/jsa.1988.49.219

It is apparent from previous studies in clinical populations that there is a high comorbidity rate between alcoholism and other psychiatric diagnoses. However, this may simply be an expression of Berkson's bias (i.e., an increased tendency for persons with multiple diagnoses to seek and receive treatment and thus fall into study populations drawn from treatment sources). In this article, we use data from the Epidemiologic Catchment Area survey to examine the comorbidity between alcohol abuse and dependence, other substances of abuse and nonsubstance psychiatric disorders in a sample of approximately 20,000 persons drawn from the general population. We also examine the effect of comorbidity on psychiatric treatment. Every one of the psychiatric diagnoses we examined was more likely to occur in alcoholics than in nonalcoholics. Associations were particularly strong with antisocial personality disorder, other substance use and mania. The association between alcoholism and depressive disorders was positive bu...

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