Autors:

CiteWeb id: 20090000219

CiteWeb score: 2953

DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa011613

Background In cross-sectional studies, elevated plasma homocysteine levels have been associated with poor cognition and dementia. Studies of newly diagnosed dementia are required in order to establish whether the elevated homocysteine levels precede the onset of dementia or result from dementia-related nutritional and vitamin deficiencies. Methods A total of 1092 subjects without dementia (667 women and 425 men; mean age, 76 years) from the Framingham Study constituted our study sample. We examined the relation of the plasma total homocysteine level measured at base line and that measured eight years earlier to the risk of newly diagnosed dementia on follow-up. We used multivariable proportional-hazards regression to adjust for age, sex, apolipoprotein E genotype, vascular risk factors other than homocysteine, and plasma levels of folate and vitamins B12 and B6. Results Over a median follow-up period of eight years, dementia developed in 111 subjects, including 83 given a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease....

The publication "Plasma Homocysteine as a Risk Factor for Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease" is placed in the Top 10000 of the best publications in CiteWeb. Also in the category Medicine it is included to the Top 1000. Additionally, the publicaiton "Plasma Homocysteine as a Risk Factor for Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease" is placed in the Top 1000 among other scientific works published in 2009.
Links to full text of the publication: